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Puberty Blues

Discussion in 'Australian Drama' started by wolfy, Mar 31, 2012.

  1. jogpsa

    jogpsa Member

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    Thanks Wolfy Seapatrolgirl. I'm very much looking forward to watching it... with the usual delay until I can get my eyes on the episodes.

    I'm really curious to see what the writers come up with. There was no mention of the original author-duo (Lette and Carey) taking any part in it at all. The original novel by Lette/Carey was more or less autobiographical - so one possibility would have been to base the 2nd series - loosely - on Lette/Carey's real lifes... but so far there was no indication that this would be the case. We'll see :woo:
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2014
  2. wolfy

    wolfy Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Thanks seapatrolgirl.

    I wonder who she means? :whistle:
  3. seapatrolgirl

    seapatrolgirl Moderator Staff Member

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    I've no idea who I meant in that post. :angel:
  4. wolfy

    wolfy Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Puberty Blues: Journey back to the good old days
    Date: February 27, 2014
    Nick Galvin

    Everything old is new again as drama rides the nostalgia wave.

    [​IMG]

    Branching out: Characters and story lines develop beyond the book in series two of Puberty Blues.

    Claudia Karvan and Jeremy Lindsay-Taylor are shooting a scene for the second series of Puberty Blues in the kitchen-diner of a southern Sydney bungalow.

    With its archways, tile-topped coffee table and vinyl-covered chairs the interior of the Blakehurst house is classic 1970s kitsch.

    It's the perfect backdrop for the action, which is placed somewhere in the late 1970s and, amazingly, everything is original. Pretty much all the set dressers had to do was hang a couple of pictures and put out some ashtrays to recreate an era that seems to hold so much fascination for modern TV viewers.

    Call it nostalgia, a yearning for a more "certain" time in our history or maybe it's just that middle-aged viewers want to see shows that remind them of their own youth; the fact is we can't get enough of the 1970s and '80s.

    Puberty Blues co-producer John Edwards knows better than most about our irresistible attraction to that period, having produced a string of dramas, including Howzat! Kerry Packer's War, Paper Giants: The Birth of Cleo and Power Games: The Packer-Murdoch Story.

    "It was the making of modern Australia and that's what is appealing about the period to me," he says. "It seemed to me that Australia changed forever during the Whitlam years. That was the Camelot period and the first throes of the change that continued through the '70s and into the '80s when we were becoming more completely ourselves."

    The first series of Puberty Blues, based on Gabrielle Carey and Kathy Lette's iconic surfie coming-of-age novel, was a strong performer for Ten last year, in part because it tapped into that vein of nostalgia but also because of the strong narrative that was surprisingly dark and gritty at times.

    Lindsay-Taylor, who plays Debbie's father, Martin, describes the first series as unquestionably the "highlight" of his career.

    "I was blown away by every aspect of it," he says. "When I saw it I knew it was something special. I was amazed and proud that Australia could produce TV like this.

    "It was something unique. It was fearless but beautiful as well - this story of these two young girls that is basically a love story."

    But where series one closely followed the story of the book, heavily featuring the adolescent trials of Debbie Vickers and her friend Susie Knight, crucially the second series develops the same characters beyond the scope of the book.

    Inevitably there were some misgivings about how going "off piste", as it were, would work out. "There was a lot of pressure on everyone," says Lindsay-Taylor. "But the writers have led from the front. Tony McNamara and Alice Bell, our two key writers, know all the characters and the actors playing them. In the first read- through the characters just jumped off the page. The beauty of this series is that every character really gets their moment and really features."

    Karvan, who plays Judy Vickers opposite Lindsay-Taylor, is equally excited by the creative freedom afforded by the second series.

    "I think in series one on any show you are finding your feet," she says. "It's a bit of an unknown quantity. But the second time around it has an audience and the characters have dropped deep down into themselves.

    "The writers have taken ownership over the material, which has given it a bit of an octane boost. There is a lot more story this time and each character has a really quite surprising, extraordinary arc - including Judy.

    "I think last time it was even more difficult to bring the adults into a book that was primarily about two teenaged girls. Now the adult characters are soaring. They are really meaty and surprising and fun."

    Karvan has her own theories about why the '70s and '80s appear to be resonating with modern audiences but there is also one very practical reason why the era works for this sort of drama - mobile phones were not even thought of then.

    "For storytelling, email and mobile phones are a bit of an obstacle because communication is so easy," she says. "When you don't have instant access to everyone all the time it is better for drama. You can't just solve a problem by picking up the phone."

    Puberty Blues is carrying a lot of Ten's midweek ratings hopes and Edwards is hoping season two will benefit from promotions during Ten's Olympics coverage.

    "There's a good promo base coming off the Winter Olympics where we can get some of that wider audience. It's not as if Ten have had that many shows that they can promo in."

    And, not unnaturally, he's talking up the potential of the show to continue beyond this second series.

    "We are, frankly, contemplating the prospect of doing seasons three, four, five and six," he says.

    Puberty Blues, Ten, Wednesday, 8.30pm
  5. Lamina

    Lamina Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Thanks for that great article, Wolfy.

    I’m loving the diversity in period settings for Australian dramas atm: Miss Fisher, Dr Blake, Love Child, Puberty Blues … and then all the ‘present day’ dramas (and I guess recent past as in Underbelly and any other true crime drama from the past decade or so).
  6. wolfy

    wolfy Super Moderator Staff Member

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    You're welcome. I love the diversity too. Everyone doesn't just jump on a successful theme here and then try to reproduce it.

    I also love period pieces. ( Too bad Miss Fisher isn't coming back too. :( )
  7. jogpsa

    jogpsa Member

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    Thanks Wolfy, that's a very informative article.
  8. wolfy

    wolfy Super Moderator Staff Member

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    You're welcome. I'm glad they're going to emphasize the adults a little more but I hope they tone down a bit on his weirdness this season. :p
  9. wolfy

    wolfy Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I finally found time to watch this week's episode. I found it a little slow at first but by the end of the episode there were lots of developments. It'll be interesting to see how they juggle some of the changes next week.
  10. wolfy

    wolfy Super Moderator Staff Member

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    [​IMG]

    The Triumphant Return Of ‘Puberty Blues’, The Best Australian TV Show You’re (Probably) Not Watching
    By Nicholas Fonseca 5/3/142 637

    Australian free-to-air television is a deceptively easy target for mockery — in fact, slagging off the nightly offerings across the five major networks is practically a national pastime. The programmers at Channel Ten, in particular, have been in the line of critical fire for the past few years: a string of locally-produced
    reality flops, executive shakeups, and backstage turmoilacross its morning and evening news divisions colluded to create a particularly nasty identity crisis for the network.

    But don’t cry into your Chiko Roll for the folks at Ten just yet. A few years ago, the channel made an excellent decision when it commissioned a TV series based on Puberty Blues, the landmark 1979 book by Kathy Lette and Gabrielle Carey that itself became a landmark 1981 movie. Reading the novel — a strongly autobiographical work about Sue Knight and Debbie Vickers, two 13-year-olds growing up in Cronulla in the Fraser era — has been a national rite of passage for decades; watching the film — a fascinating time capsule that boasts the most earworm-y of theme songs – is practically a federal requirement if you wish to call yourself an Australian.

    I fielded more than a few funny looks from friends after I banged on about the brilliance of the show’s first season when it aired in 2012. After all, for the uninitiated (or, more specifically, for most men), the idea that a show called Puberty Blues was intelligent, provocative and mature television could seem pretty ridiculous. But those who brushed off the show for fear it was little more than a weekly overdose of televised oestrogen did themselves a disservice. Perhaps no Australian TV show of the past few years has been so underestimated, or so good.



    On bankies, molls and spunks: What Puberty Blues gets very right
    Puberty Blues is ostensibly about Debbie and Sue’s fiercely loyal friendship, and the pressures they face as they fumble towards womanhood. That it happens against the backdrop of Australia in the late ‘70s is no small accident — in promos for the series (and on the Season One DVD packaging), the show was advertised as “A story about a nation growing up.”

    Which may be a tad misleading — if you want a blow-by-blow of Australian politics at the end of the ‘70s, you aren’t going to get it here. What you will get is a primer in old-school Australian lingo (star Brenna Harding actually created an A-to-Z cheat sheet to the show’s idiosyncratic vocabulary, which you can find on its Facebook page), as well as a keenly observed and beautifully acted take on the era’s rapidly evolving sexual mores and how they affected not just impressionable, horny high schoolers but also their baby-boomer parents. This is far from a simple ‘high school’ show — equal weight is accorded the girls’ mothers and fathers, who are anxiously trying to behave like grown-ups and raise smart, self-possessed young women in an era that encouraged permissiveness and hedonism.

    Australian TV mainstays Claudia Karvan and Susie Porter each give fine portrayals as Debbie and Sue’s respective mothers Judy and Pam, whose very different approaches to parenting create an ongoing tension that never devolves into cheap or catty competition. Judy is an uptight school principal who has a hard time laughing at herself; Pam is a freewheeling libertine who’s not above embarrassing her daughter by running naked on the beach or boldly passing along her copy of The Joy Of Sex. The show’s father figures are also handled with empathy: actors Jeremy Lindsay Taylor (Vicki’s sexually-frustrated dad Martin, who spent much of the first season masturbating in the garage) and Daniel Wyllie (Sue’s dad Roger, who took a daring career risk in last season’s finale) are just as compelling playing two men trying to maintain their grip on patriarchy at a time when the nuclear family was starting its slide towards cultural irrelevance.

    So, yes: the adult storylines are great. But Debbie and Sue’s are even better. When the first season aired, Ashleigh Cummings (as Vicki) and Brenna Harding (Sue) won heaps of deserved critical praise — Harding, in fact, won a Logie for Most Popular New Female Talent last year, and you can watch her beautiful acceptance speech here. Their portrayals of the lovable, goofy outcasts are unaffected and, in many instances, close to heartbreaking (it’s rare to see a young female friendship rendered so beautifully in any medium.) In Season One, the series’ main story arc chronicled Debbie and Sue’s attempts at cracking the cool-kid code and becoming part of the ultra-popular Greenhills Gang, a group of gnarly surfers who wanted nothing to do with girls unless they were spreading their legs for a quick and dirty root. Debbie and Sue’s insouciance towards this sexist convention peaked in the Season One finale, which closed with a scene that played like a glorious ‘**** you’ on behalf of every woman who’s ever been told she can’t run with the boys — and it brought a few tears to my eyes.

    One of Puberty Blues’ greatest assets is a willingness to just go there, and I promise that even the most enlightened among you will probably find yourself wincing in shock multiple times per episode. Sex among teenagers — as a power grab, a curiosity or a half-hearted attempt at appeasement — is presented in all of its icky, weird, exhilarating glory. Literal gang bangs in the backs of panel vans, awkward alternatives for lubrication (“Got any Vaso?”), attempts at self-abortion, and, in the new season, one particularly graphic situation that turns, erm, pretty sticky are presented without judgement or condescension. I hesitate to call this stuff revolutionary, but it’s certainly unlike most of what the executives who commission Australia’s free-to-air series are bold enough to slap onscreen on any given night. Following along as young fans react to each episode on Twitter, for instance, is always a joy. Take a look:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    -

    Just watch this great show already, will you?
    It’s almost too easy to parody the 1970s, what with their ridiculous hairstyles, antiquated sexual politics, questionable interior design trends, and utterly daggy pop-culture artifacts. (Speaking of which, anybody keen to see Helen Reddy when she tours the country next month?) Too often, it’s those lovably chintzy traits that unfairly take centre stage at the expense of finely wrought storytelling when filmmakers, screenwriters and actors decide to dramatise the era for mass consumption.

    The makers of Puberty Blues understand those hallmarks are part-and-parcel of any project that re-imagines the period. But I assure you this: they’ve wisely taken this show far beyond those simple, hackneyed fallbacks and created something truly special. You really should check out Puberty Blues. If you’re a fan of lovingly crafted, finely written and gorgeously acted Australian TV dramas (of which there simply aren’t enough), you owe it to yourself and the show’s fleet creative team, who’ve worked wonders with a well-worn text that, on its face, may not seem relevant to the world as we know it in 2014. You won’t regret it, ya moll!

    -

    Season Two of Puberty Blues premieres on Network Ten at 8:30pm tonight.

    -

    Nicholas Fonseca is a freelance writer and editor and (sometime) master of film studies student based in Sydney. A former editor at Madison, Fonseca has written for WHO, Sunday Life and Foxtel magazines; prior to his arrival in Sydney, he was based in New York City, where he spent a decade as a staff member with Entertainment Weekly.

  11. wolfy

    wolfy Super Moderator Staff Member

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    SNEAK PEEK: Brenna Harding and Ashleigh Cummings up to mischief in Puberty Blues season two

    • 5 DAYS AGO MARCH 05, 2014 12:08PM
    • THE wait is almost over for the return of Channel 10’s hit 1970s drama Puberty Blues.

    Best friends Debbie (Ashleigh Cummings) and Sue (Brenna Harding) are back in season two, and they’re determined to find Sue someone suitable to “go round with”.

    When we last left Sue at the end of season one, she had dropped her boyfriend Danny Dixon. In tonight’s episode the teens devise a quiz for potential suitors and their first willing guinea pig is Woody (played by Christian Byers) from science class.

    Aussie newcomer Byers, 20, is best known for featuring in the hit film December Boys alongside Daniel Radcliffe.

    [​IMG]
    Christian Byers stars as Woody in Puberty Blues season two. Source: Supplied

    We can’t wait to hear some of the lingo of the era — terms such as “deadset perve’, “ya moll”, “rack off” and “you’re dropped” — back on our television screens.

    Harding, 17, and Cummings, 21, said the phrases were embraced by Puberty Bluesviewers first time round. and fans would even call them out to her on the street.

    “When the show was on air, for a little while I’d go out with hats and sunglasses to try to avoid getting followed in the shops,” the Logie winner told News Ltd.

    [​IMG]
    Up to no good? Ashleigh Cummings and Brenna Harding as Debbie and Sue in Puberty Blues. Source: Supplied

    Season two of the AACTA and Logie Award-winning drama also sees the return of stars Claudia Karvan, Sean Keenan, Charlotte Best, Dan Wylie, Susie Porter, Rodger Corser, Jeremy Lindsay Taylor and Isabelle Cornish.

    Puberty Blues season two premieres Wednesday 5 March, 8.30pm on TEN.

    [​IMG]
    The chemistry between Harding and Cummings seen in season one as inseperable besties is back. Source: Supplied
  12. jogpsa

    jogpsa Member

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    Thanks Wolfy, great articles.... especially the one from Nicholas Fonseca. I wholeheartedly agree with "even the most enlightened among you will probably find yourself wincing in shock multiple times per episode." :rofl:
  13. wolfy

    wolfy Super Moderator Staff Member

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    You're welcome. I thought they were great article. And ....:oops:...I admit to a little wincing.:grin:

    There has also been a little head shaking. Debbie and Sue seemed so happy when Debbie's mum invited Sue's family over, but if she really wanted to show that she was not a bad influence on Debbie, why would she bring the beer, ciggies, and pills? :rofl: :rofl: And then be so shocked at the outcome. :oops:
  14. wolfy

    wolfy Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I finally caught up on the last two episodes. I thought the openness about that book was hilarious. How many mothers would chose that one. :rofl: And the whole, "if you're not enjoying it you're not doing it right" attitude.:rofl:

    Next week's episode looks like it's going to be a little intense.
  15. jogpsa

    jogpsa Member

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    I'm lagging behind....:run: hope to find a moment to watch ep 2 and 3 soon ....
  16. wolfy

    wolfy Super Moderator Staff Member

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    You need to catch up. It's getting very interesting again.
  17. wolfy

    wolfy Super Moderator Staff Member

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    This episode was very intense and next week's looks to be more of the same. So much is happening at once now. Time to catch up, people!!
  18. wolfy

    wolfy Super Moderator Staff Member

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    CHARLOTTE BEST INTERVIEW FOR PUBERTY BLUES SEASON 2

    Charlotte Best on Her Favourite Thing About Puberty Blues Season Two
    by Jessica Chandra
    26/3/14

    [​IMG]

    Charlotte Best loves her job on Puberty Blues, but if there's one thing she hates, it's the blonde streaks she has to get dyed in for her role as Cheryl — looks like things aren't so different from when we last interviewed her! At least off-screen. Onscreen, Charlotte's already had to face big storylines, including her character's abortion and moving in with the Vickers family. We spoke with Charlotte on what it was like to return to the Australian drama, and why she loves working with Claudia Karvan.

    POPSUGAR Australia: What's different this time around compared to first season, in general?
    Charlotte Best: A lot is different, but I'm just amazed at how fresh and new it can be without getting rid of the good stuff; like the good stuff that everybody loved about it, it's just so seamless and has carried straight on, like the sets and the look of it. You get to see so much more of certain characters, and you get to delve a little bit into their world, especially my character. It's exciting for me because my character gets a really good season.

    The gang has grown up a bit, so you automatically expect certain things to happen, and it takes off in a direction you don't expect it to, which is pretty cool. You don't want to be bored and watch the same stuff. The writing is insanely good; they've done such a good job, like both seasons. It's blown me away. My favourite thing is the humour about it, too.

    PS: Being the second season, it's almost like a movie having a sequel. Did you guys feel any pressure coming back the second time?
    CB: Absolutely, you feel that pressure. You feel people have responded so well, and you think, 'You don't want to ruin it now, because people actually want it, and want to see what they like about it.' It's so easy with our director Glendyn [Ivin] — he's magical, like the way he has this vision of what it's going to be like. There's a bit of pressure but everyone's pretty relaxed, because you get the feeling that you are creating something good. And especially because things do change, you wonder how people are going to respond to them.

    PS: It's great that you have the freedom to not stick to the book this time, but it still feels like it's in the spirit of the book and the first season.
    CB: Once you get going there are so many cool things you can do, so they couldn't help putting in a few extra storylines in there. Even the character differences are cool; everyone is still the same, but you delve a lot deeper this season. You can establish them.


    [​IMG]

    PS: What is Cheryl's relationship like with her mum now?
    CB: OK [laughs]. Well in season one her relationship wasn't very good with her, and there were problems there. You get to see a lot more of what Cheryl's life is actually like in this season, and you get to see why she is the way she is. The way she's been brought up is really bad — there's a reason why she's such a b*tch! [Laughs] It just deteriorates like crazy in this season; a lot of things go wrong. There are a lot of problems I don't think many mothers and daughters have to deal with. It does provide very interesting stories.

    PS: You get a lot more scenes with Claudia Karvan and Jeremy Lindsay Taylor this season. What's that been like?
    CB: Oh, it's been the best time of my life. I've learnt so much from them, and had so much fun. Claudia is like my mentor and I look up to her so much. She doesn't try to teach me a lot, like she doesn't force anything on me, but being around her when she acts, you learn so much. Our storylines are really cool together; we have some really funny stuff. The character difference between her and Cheryl is quite comical when you put them together.

    PS: Is Cheryl still a mean girl this time?
    CB: Absolutely [laughs]. It's still the case. There are a few things that change, but we've kept the bully in her for most of the season. But once you get to know her a bit, viewers will want good things for her.

    PS: Which scenes do you like filming the most and the least?
    CB: The scenes I liked filming the most this season were the ones with Claudia and I in the Vickers house. There were times on set when Claudia and I could not stop laughing; we'd have laughing fits and couldn't look each other in the eye. There were times when the camera was on one person, and the other person was looking at the ground [laughs]. It was a ball. And with little Ed Oxenbould, who plays David. He is one-of-a-kind, the funniest little kid. Cheryl and David develop a really good relationship.

    There's always awkward stuff you have to do when you're playing a character like mine. There are a couple of sex scenes and stuff like that. But it's so much easier than it looks. On set everyone is mucking around and it's not serious. You just get on with it and do it. You know everyone so well so you don't feel uncomfortable. The only thing I don't like filming is when we have to be in the cold, like when we have to be at the freezing cold beach or if it's night time, in our little skimpy outfits. That's not the best fun.

    Puberty Blues airs on Wednesdays at 8:30 p.m. on Network Ten.

    Source: Network Ten
  19. wolfy

    wolfy Super Moderator Staff Member

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    SEAN KEENAN INTERVIEW FOR PUBERTY BLUES SEASON 2

    What Does Sean Keenan Have In Common With His Puberty Blues Character?
    by Jessica Chandra
    12/3/14

    [​IMG]

    Like many of his fellow young co-stars, Sean Keenan was relatively unknown when he landed the role of Gary Hennessy on Puberty Blues in 2012, but he quickly became a fan favourite after delivering an affecting performance of a teenage boy who struggles with his relationship with his father, gets caught up in drugs, and falls in love. At the end of season one, Gary’s story was, as Sean explains, “kind of up in the air,” but it’s clear the character lived on and has matured in season two. So what are the biggest things Gary has to face this time, and how does he deal with them? Here’s what Sean told POPSUGAR Australia.

    POPSUGAR Australia: Remind me where we left your character at the end of season one.
    Sean Keenan: At the end of season one, it was kind of up in the air. A lot of people didn’t know whether he was dying or not, because he was addicted to heroin, and the last time we see him he’s having a hit, instead of lying down into his bed, so people thought he was going to OD. But no, he lives on and clings to life. He actually gets off the heroin this season. He’s clean. And it makes way for him to develop more as a person, without the drugs hindering that. He was a pretty big stoner; he was into it all. It’s good, he’s less foggy and bit more pro-active, which is cool.

    PS: What do you have in common with Gary, or how do you relate to him?
    SK: I consider myself a bit more of an assertive and opinionated person. And a more energetic person [laughs]. And that’s what he’s moving towards in this season; I was doing some scenes and thought I was bringing more of Sean into it. Which was weird! He gets off the drugs but he’s still chasing the rush, but it’s more of an adrenaline rush this season. He gets into a bit of trouble, but also focuses on good things as well, like helping out his mum, standing up for his mum. And standing up for the girls against the other guys who are just sort of getting real sloppy, or getting on the heroin.

    I think now I can draw more connection between me and him. We both obviously surf, which is pretty much my only form of exercise, and something I’m very passionate about. Sport is a very big part of who a person is, and we both surf. It’s good! It feels good to be out on the water.

    PS: So this is obviously the perfect role for you.
    SK: Yeah! We have days where you’re just paid to surf for a day! And unless you’re a professional surfer, who the f**k does that? It’s great! It’s just sick. “Paid to surf for a day.” I can’t stop saying it! I love that idea. And I get to do it.

    PS: Two big things for Gary this season are his relationship with Debbie, and what happens when she gets sent to boarding school, and also the return of his dad. So how does Gary cope with these scenarios?
    SK: The separation from Debbie, it’s pretty hard on both of them. They’re the only couple out of the show, out of the young cast, who are actually in love, not just in lust. They really do care for each other, and she gets sent quite far away. They struggle. And his dad does come back, and his dad is constantly telling him that Gary is his dad, like, “You are me.” Gary doesn’t want to turn into that person. But there’s a bit there where he almost gets tempted, and he almost believes he is his dad, and sometimes you almost see it come out. That drives him to be a little bit unfaithful when Debbie is away. So their relationship definitely gets tested, but I think they are so in love that things will always work out for them. Or at least you hope so.

    PS: People are definitely rooting for them, pardon the pun.
    SK: Yes, rooting for them. Oh, nice — I see what you did there [laughs].


    [​IMG]

    PS: For you, what are the hardest kinds of scenes to film?
    SK: It’s weird. There’s not a type of scene. Sometimes it can just be if you’re tired, or scenes won’t click. There’s no excuse, it’s just sometimes you know it’s not right. I do scenes with lots of people, but especially me and Susan [Prior], who plays my mum, we often talk about scenes once we’ve done quite a bit, and we go back and analyse. It depends who you’re with, and sometimes you’ll be with someone who’s keen to sit down and nut out a scene, like, “How can we make this work?” Sometimes you can feel it’s not right. And it’s not necessarily going to be a hard scene; it could be the most simple scene written down on paper. And then you get there, and in that situation you’re like, “What the f**k? Why isn’t this working?”

    We had one [scene] where I think I had to come in, arrive home, and mum’s saying goodbye to a man she’s seeing, and I just say, “What are you doing?” It was so simple, but something wasn’t right. But we nutted it out in the end, and it’s good when you have someone who’s willing to sit with you, and really cares about the other person as much as they do for their own performance, and look at scenes as a whole. Emotional scenes, sometimes they come extremely easily, sometimes they don’t; it depends how you’re feeling at the time. I think the bigger scenes are not as bad because I get myself amped up for them, and you always make sure you’re very focused — drink a couple of coffees, get all amped up [laughs]. Basically the harder ones aren’t always the ones that may seem the hardest. And big scenes that you have to shoot a million times can get a bit tedious as well. Especially when you’re cold and it’s late at night.

    PS: What do you and the rest of the young cast get up to when you’re not required on set?
    SK: We all hang out. Me and the boys will go surfing a lot; Dylan [Goodearl] and Jack [Horsley] both have big vans and swing by to pick me up. If I hang out with the girls, we just hang a few drinks out at some bar. Just like normal people.

    PS: Which actors’ careers or acting choices do you admire?
    SK: I’m a really big fan of Joel Edgerton. There was an interview he did in the Sunday Times or something that was probably the most intelligent interview I’ve ever read, from an actor. It was so long ago. Just his insights, and the fact that he didn’t crack it until later. He said something like, “If I had become big when I was younger, I don’t think I would have handled it, or done it how I’ve done it.” He’s so humble, and I love that. And so smart. I love his work as an actor and think he’s very talented. I always loved Heath Ledger. In terms of females, I love Emma Stone; I think she’s great. She’s so funny and smart. And I think Cate Blanchett is great too. I name a lot of Aussies. I like Michael Fassbender, too — he’s very strong.

    Puberty Blues airs on Wednesdays at 8:30 p.m. on Network Ten.

    Source: Network Ten
  20. wolfy

    wolfy Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Puberty Blues star Isabelle Cornish in drama pilot Sea of Fire
    • by: Dianne Butler TV Columnist
    • From: News Corp Australia
    • 3 hours ago April 02, 2014 12:00AM
    [​IMG]
    Next big thing ... Puberty Blues star Isabelle Cornish. Picture: Channel 10 Source: Supplied

    ISABELLE Cornish must be growing accustomed to wearing a “next big thing” label.

    Cornish is on the phone from Vancouver, where she’s working on the drama pilot, Sea of Fire.

    If Sea of Fire goes to series, the career stocks of the Puberty Blues star will skyrocket.

    Sea of Fire is about three girls whose double lives tear their families apart.

    Mayhem ensues when the girls make an X-rated movie and one of them goes missing.

    “I was really lucky. I came here towards the end of summer for pilot season and the pilot I auditioned for was the one I got,” Cornish says.

    “I’m playing a cheerleader with a dark side.”

    Cornish is no stranger to dealing with heavy subject matter, having faced testing times in the role of Vicki on Puberty Blues.

    Vicki is touted as a character who knows the power of sex.

    Cornish, the sister of actor Abbie Cornish, says: “The sex scenes were the most challenging thing to do. We were lucky because as a cast we became very close and open so it (shooting the scenes) wasn’t that weird.”

    ***Puberty Blues, Channel 10, Wednesday, 8.30pm

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